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Reporter Rawyah Rageh: ‘Al Jazeera was a dirty word in Egypt’

Reporter Rawyah Rageh: 'Al Jazeera was a dirty word in Egypt'

Al Jazeera reporter and Columbia Journalism School graduate Rawyah Rageh recently spoke to students about covering the Egyptian revolution: the dangers she faced and lessons she learned.


We are Egypt

We are Egypt

The unfinished film “We are Egypt,” directed by Lillie Paquette, is a reminder that the Egyptian revolution did not happen overnight; it was simmering throughout the past two years. It also gives faces and names to those unknown heroes who were instrumental in starting the revolution through Facebook and Twitter.


Captives freed; lessons learned

Captives freed; lessons learned

Just 10 days after they were released from captivity in Libya, four New York Times correspondents shared behind-the-scenes stories and lessons learned with students at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism Thursday evening.


Notes from the Egyptian Revolution

Notes from the Egyptian Revolution

Inventive, organized, youthful, modern. That’s how author and political commentator Ahdaf Soueif described the Egyptian Revolution at Columbia University’s Edward Said Memorial Lecture.


Muslims and supporters protest congressional “radicalization” hearings

Muslims and supporters protest congressional "radicalization" hearings

Protesters in Times Square on March 10 held signs and wore T-shirts bearing the rally’s slogan, “Today, I am Muslim, too.” Others said it was unjust to single out a religious group as a threat to national security.


A milestone as we head miles away

A milestone as we head miles away

The recent assaults on two high-profile journalists reporting from Egypt—Anderson Cooper and Lara Logan—were just the latest attacks on reporters in the field. Over the last 20 years, 850 journalists have been killed and thousands of others have been abducted, assaulted and shot at.


A poetic role in the revolutions

A poetic role in the revolutions

Muhsin al-Musawi’s talk looked at the Tunisian street and Tahrir Square as literary texts themselves. He explained that the way the
revolutionary scene unfolded was much like a narrative, with players fighting for space, virtual (on the Internet) and representational.
“The virtual space is spilling into the street itself,” Musawi said.


God on tap

God on tap

New York Catholics packed Connolly’s Pub and Restaurant on February 28 for a lesson on practicing their faith where you’d least expect to see it: on the job.


Step one: tweet. Step two: march.

While the Americans came to understand the uprisings in Egypt in large part through Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, these websites were not the sole vehicle of change. It was “people willing to have their heads broken open to make a difference” that toppled President Hosni Mubarak’s regime, according to a participant on a panel held at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs.


Little Egypt celebrates Mubarak’s fall

Little Egypt celebrates Mubarak's fall

Elated Egyptians took over Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, on February 11 to celebrate President Hosni Mubarak’s resignation.


Mubarak steps down, Egyptian-Americans rejoice

Mubarak steps down, Egyptian-Americans rejoice

As was Tahrir Square, so was Little Egypt, New York. Egyptian-Americans celebrate their sweet victory the moment they hear the news of President Mubarak stepping down. Raksha Kumar reports from Little Egypt, in Astoria, Queens.


“Information Wars” explores social media revolution

"Information Wars" explores social media revolution

The most potent tool that was used in the Egypt revolution was social media. Al Jazeera’s “Information Wars” looked deeper into this phenomenon.