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74th Street in Jackson Heights, Queens, is known as Little India.

74th Street in Jackson Heights, Queens, is known as Little India.

Population 68,263 people living in New York City were born in India
Source: 2000 United States Census
Neighborhoods Flushing, Queens: 6,495
Richmond Hill, Queens: 4,295
Elmhurst, Queens: 4,161
Forest Hills, Queens: 3,901
Source: “The Newest New Yorkers Briefing Booklet” (2000), http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/pdf/census/nny_briefing_booklet.pdf
Religion(s) Hindu, Sikh, Jain
Language(s) Hindi, Gujarati, Punjabi, Urdu, Tamil, Telugu
History
Indian immigration began in large waves as a result of the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act. Many filled out occupational/workers section on immigration forms, US was looking for medical professionals and scientists, many Indians came over with PhDs and Masters degrees; the Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1976 slowed down some professional migration, but did not affect family members of those already in US from leaving South Asia. Source: “The Karma of Brown Folk” by Vijay Prashad.

Population Facts:

  • 36.7% not English proficient, therefore 63.3 % are English proficient – fourth highest after Trinidad, Jamaica, and Guyana. Source: “The Newest New Yorkers Briefing Booklet” (2000), http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/pdf/census/nny_briefing_booklet.pdf
  • Median Household Income: $50,000 – the average NYC foreign born median household income is $35,000. The Indian immigrant income is second highest after Philippines which is $70,000. Most other communities seem to be much closer to the average income, therefore the Indian immigrant community has a significantly larger income than average. Source: “The Newest New Yorkers Briefing Booklet” (2000), http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/pdf/census/nny_briefing_booklet.pdf

Fun Facts:

  • Curry Hill is a hot bed for Indian eating in Manhattan. Source: http://events.nytimes.com/2008/10/12/nyregion/thecity/12rest.html. 6th Street between First and Second avenues in the East Village is also a hotbed for Indian cuisine.
  • Little India is the section of Jackson Heights along 74th Street between 37th and Roosevelt avenues. Source: http://queens.about.com/cs/neighborhoods/a/jackson_heights.htm
  • The Diwali festival is the festival of lights. There will be a huge celebration at the Southstreet Seaport on October 4, and another one in Jackson Heights on October 11.