Arts & Culture

Uncle Vanya: From Russia With Love

Uncle Vanya: From Russia With Love

Since its opening in 1992, Uncle Vanya has been a place for the Russian arts community to meet, mingle and network. While the restaurant used to host frequent events and readings, it slowed down in the last nine years. Uncle Vanya’s owner, however, is committed to re-establishing its identity as a supporter, promoter, and haven for Russian artists.


Mexicans in New York celebrate Guadalupe

Mexicans in New York celebrate Guadalupe

By PAULA NEUDORF
For many Mexicans, the fest is like “celebrating her birthday,” according to Cesar Rodriquez, a representative from Tepeyac, an organization which offers cultural events and classes for New York’s Mexican immigrants.


At Chinatown’s Edge, Museum Doubles Visitors

At Chinatown’s Edge, Museum Doubles Visitors

BY SUSIE POPPICK
After a month of working down the street from the relocated Museum of Chinese in America, software engineer Nicholas Bergson-Shilcock succumbed to curiosity.
On a sunny Saturday afternoon, he pushed open the museum’s back door on Lafayette Street, just yards from his office. He was immediately stopped by a guard, who sent Bergson-Shilcock around [...]


From One to Three: The Hopeful Piecing of a Movement

From One to Three: The Hopeful Piecing of a Movement

BY SOMMER SAADI
Ramon Mejia has spent the past 10 years at the helm of an organization intended to quell the violence in his Colombian homeland. He called the group Movement for Peace in Colombia, though even he concedes that membership — at best 40 and at present, merely 12 — hardly justifies the name.


Lunchtime in Curry Hill

Lunchtime in Curry Hill

BY CAROLINE ROTHSTEIN
This epicenter of Indian cuisine makes it the lunchtime destination for South Asian taxi drivers.


Little Tragedies Looking for Big Successes

Little Tragedies Looking for Big Successes

BY ZACHARY SNIDERMAN
Pushkin Square in Moscow is one of the busiest intersections in Russia. It is watched over by a statue to its namesake, Alexander Pushkin, the 19th century writer called “The Shakespeare of Russia.”
In New York, he is basically unknown.
This was one of several obstacles for Julian Lowenfeld, the director, composer, and translator of [...]


Preparing for the Pulaski Day Parade

Preparing for the Pulaski Day Parade

BY IAN THOMSON
While previous Pulaski Day parades focused on a central theme, this year’s event broke with tradition to commemorate a number of different landmarks. Jennifer Costa, vice-president of the General Pulaski Memorial Parade Committee—the organization that runs the event—explained that the 2009 parade was honoring, among others, the 70th anniversary of the Nazi/Soviet invasion of Poland, the 65th anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising, and the 20th anniversary of the end of communism in Poland.


Jackson Heights Rivals Manhattan Neighborhoods as Gay Center

Jackson Heights Rivals Manhattan Neighborhoods as Gay Center

BY PAULA NEUDORF
It’s an unlikely spot for a gay club: an unglamorous corner on Roosevelt Avenue in Jackson Heights, Queens. There’s a homely taqueria across the street, and a block north, sari vendors and Middle Eastern shops ply their wares. Working-class families and school kids pass by, unaware of or indifferent to the club’s facade.


Hindus Adjust an Ancient Ritual in a Modern World

Hindus Adjust an Ancient Ritual in a Modern World

BY CAROLINE ROTHSTEIN
It was just before noon on Tuesday when Bhanu Shetty, a henna tattoo artist, set up her table outside an Indian clothing store on 74th Street in Jackson Heights.


Chess Tournament Brings Out Players of All Ages and Skill Levels for Largest Outdoor Tournament in U.S.

Chess Tournament Brings Out Players of All Ages and Skill Levels for Largest Outdoor Tournament in U.S.

BY SOMMER SAADI
Five-year-old Jason Jiang races through Central Park toward the Bethesda Fountain. It’s 11:35 a.m. and he and his parents are 35 minutes late for his first Chess-in-the-Parks Rapid tournament.


Guyanese Listen for a Different Kind of Tweet

Guyanese Listen for a Different Kind of Tweet

BY SCOTT SELL

The men gather in Smokey Oval Park before sunrise, sipping coffee from Styrofoam cups as they walk around to see what their competition looks like. And sounds like.


A Night of Fashion, Russian Style

A Night of Fashion, Russian Style

BY ZACHARY SNIDERMAN
“A Night of Fashion – Russian Style” featured models, vodka and maxillofacial reconstructive surgery. However, the surgery this fashion-week charity event supported wasn’t for the models; it was for children in Russia.


Ramadan Means Good Business for Hindus in Queens

Ramadan Means Good Business for Hindus in Queens

BY CAROLINE ROTHSTEIN

As the month-long holiday of Ramadan came to a close Sunday, the Muslim commercial strip of Jackson Heights, Queens, was quiet and shuttered, while the Hindu side bustled with Muslim customers. Eid commemorated the end of Ramadan, when Muslims fasted daily from sun up to sun down for a month.


Harlem Market Dresses Africans, African-Americans

Harlem Market Dresses Africans, African-Americans

BY KATIE MOISSE
Despite the dim economy, the Malcolm Shabazz Harlem Market is bright with traditional West African merchandise. The market still brings West Africans closer together and African Americans closer to their roots.


Honduran Independence Parade

Honduran Independence Parade

BY VICTOR LI
Audio slideshow from the Honduran independence parade


Nine-Year-Old Girl Wins Spelling Bee

Nine-Year-Old Girl Wins Spelling Bee

BY VICTOR LI

For 9-year-old Shivani Angappan, “poinsettia” spelled v-i-c-t-o-r-y. Luckily for her, she didn’t actually spell it that way.

With the poise of someone twice her age and the vocabulary of someone three times as old, Angappan strode to the microphone and proved that she didn’t need spell-check, an iPhone app. or an electronic dictionary in order to spell.